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Workshop Online di Composizione Coreografica

con Anabella Lenzu

20 e 21 Novembre, 2021

Time: 15-19 ora italiana, via ZOOM

Il workshop offre ai partecipanti gli strumenti proncipali per la creazione di materiale coroegrafico, esplorando elementi di composizione sia teatrale che cinematografica. Verrà analizzato il processo creativo, imparando a correre dei rischi e a trasformare l’emozione in pensiero e il pensiero in scelte artistiche. Con l’aiuto di brevi attività durante la lezione e ampia ricerca personale, gli studenti investigheranno forma e contenuti nell’ambito della coreografia. I partecipanti creeranno e performeranno i loro studi personali basandosi su problemi coroegrafico. Non solo ci si soffermerà su cosa viene danzato, ma verrà anche posta la domanda: “perché danziamo?”. La danza è il mezzo espressivo del nostro cuore, della nostra mente e della nostra anima.

Obiettivi del Corso

  • Comprendere elementi coroegrafici e spaziali
  • Sviluppare un vocabolario personale tramite l’improvvisazione e la ricerca di movimento
  • Sviluppare un tema e un soggetto
  • Identificare diversi stili e forme coreografiche
  • Sviluppare l’abilità di analizzare criticamente e in maniera articolata una coreografia con occhio oggettivo.
  • Imparare a dare feedback, apprezzando e rispettando i processi creativi dei colleghi.
  • Sviluppare le abilità di pensiero critico
  • Prendere sicurezza nel comprendere ciò che si osserva.
  • Sviluppare un proprio senso estetico.

IL CORSO HA UN NUMERO MASSIMO DI 20 STUDENTI.

Organizzazione: Luca Villa

PER ISCRIVERSI: MANDARE UNA LETTERA DI INTERESSE SPIEGANDO PERCHÉ SI È INTERESSATI A PARTECIPARE E IL VOSTOR CURRICULUM VITAE A ALDDADMIN@ANABELLALENZU.COM

IL COSTO DEL WORKSHOP È DI EU 200 PER PERSONA.

NB: ALLA FINE DI OGNI WORKSHOP OGNUNO RICEVERÀ UN ATTESTATO DI PRESENZA.

www.AnabellaLenzu.com/news

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Saturdays, September, 11, 18 & 25, 2021

  • 12-2pm (EDT) NYC Time

This three-day workshop will be led by choreographer Anabella Lenzu and photographer Todd Carroll.The objective of the course is to gain an understanding of choreographing for the camera and the choreography of the camera when recording dance for all screens. Explore how to adapt, extract and see choreographic material transform from 3D to 2D.We will lead participants through exercises, discussions, and works that look at therole of performance and the use of movement in filmmaking, embracing risks and limitations.I invite participants to explore questions like: What is Choreography? How do we read dance now? What is performancefor you now during the pandemic?

For Filmmakers, directors, choreographers anddancers interested in dance film collaborations.

To REGSITER: https://www.anabellalenzu.com/workshops

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By Anabella Lenzu

What does the word mentor mean in our Western culture?
Mentor: 1) A trusted counselor or guide. A mentor who, because he is detached and disinterested, can hold up a mirror to us— P. W. Keve
2) Tutor, coach; to teach or guide usually individually in a special subject or for a particular purpose
Synonyms: Verb: coach, counsel, guide, lead, tutor

We use the word “mentor” for anyone who makes a positive, guiding influence on another person’s life.
Not every dance teacher can be, or wants to be a mentor, because it’s a mutual decision of total generosity between the mentor and the mentee. Finding the right mentor is like finding the right partner. It’s complicated!

Being a mentor is essentially about being a role model in all aspects: professionally, artistically and ethically, which implies responsibility and deep care.

As a Latina artist living and working in NYC, I reflect on my past and my future and what it means to be a mentor in these times. Being a mentor is not just being a source of inspiration, much less a reference on a job application.
It is about committing to deep dialogue, sometimes intense and difficult.

As a building is constructed, scaffolding surrounds it. Doubts crumble and ricochet down, while beliefs are supported and strengthened.

What is the difference between teaching and mentoring?
1. Teaching Is About Knowledge
The role of the teacher is to share their knowledge through instruction and explanation. In the traditional sense, teaching involves formal lessons on a subject, often including a detailed lesson plan and methods of assessment.

2. Mentoring Is About Experience
Mentoring, on the other hand, is more informal and relational in nature. A mentor acts as an advisor, sharing knowledge based on their lived experience. There’s more sharing between the two as mentors strive to help their mentees grow into peers.

Why do we need mentors in our artistic lives?
A young artist is sometimes lost and disoriented. It’s not uncommon to bounce between feeling wildly insecure and being a devilish rebel. Growing into the life of an artist is difficult, but very rewarding!
Mentors aid in navigating one’s fear of failure, eliminating distractions, and locating resources while often helping to strengthen a poor support system (emotional, economical or psychological),
Mentors are like beacons that re-orient, helping you find your inner strength and your artistic ancestors.

Many times when teaching, (especially dance criticism or dance history) I find that many people do not know important and influential dancers, teachers or choreographers that came before them, and they have no curiosity in learning. This leads to a kind of arrogant ignorance, thinking they are creating something new when they are repeating something that happened in the 60’s. We cannot know everything, but it is a waste of energy to repeat an old idea that’s already a part of the shared dance legacy. Dance education is about honoring the past, celebrating diversity, while also researching in order to move ahead and push the boundaries of our field.

I feel that one needs to be in dialogue with your artistic ancestors in order to make progress, to grow as an artist and human being. The old adage is true, you have to know where you’ve been to know where you are going. Mentors help you in that journey.

Sometimes you need to rebel against your ancestors and disagree with your mentors, and that’s also part of growing for some!

Most of my mentors were international visual artists, writers, regisseurs, theater directors, and choreographers. Why? As a curious artist, I needed to know what happened behind the scenes in different genres. How can I “make it” as an artist in a world where knowledge was so scarce? I needed to understand the artist and the person behind each of my mentors, in order to find who I was. There is an important distinction to be made between mentors and inspirational artists I never met in person. Getting involved with different art forms and disciplines has given me greater perspective to understand the possibilities and the limitations in making my own artistic choices.

My first mentor was the Argentinean sculptor Rafael Martin (1935-2018). I studied sculpture with him from 1995-1999 in Bahia Blanca, Argentina. Guy Ariel Kruh (1953-), a French semiologist and regisseur, was my second, and I studied Semiology of Theater and the Delsart system with him.

For choreography, my first mentor was the American dancer and teacher Jim May. Under his wing, I learned to be even more acute with my artistic choices in the dance field. When I moved back to the U.S. in 2005, I started to take classes again with him (who at that time was the Artistic Director of Anna Sokolow Dance project), and after two months I just quit. He could not understand why I did not come to class. It was not because I did not like the class or because of the technique. I just felt that it was becoming too strong of an influence on my movement vocabulary, and every time I would begin my own choreography, I was using Anna’s choreographic approach. I needed to create some distance, not personally but artistically. I needed space to explore who I was.

In 2007, Jim called me and asked me to choreograph for the Anna Sokolow Theater Ensemble and of course I said yes, as it was a tremendous honor. It was thrilling to reacquaint my own voice with Jim and Anna’s technique and artistry. At that time I was already on another path, finding my own way.

I feel that sometimes students can never find their voice because they are always under the influence of a certain style, teacher, or academy. Some dancers need to keep their traditions because their function is to keep that tradition going and pass it on to the next generation.

But there are other dancers and choreographers that need to find their own voice, and that was my path. It was painful because at the same time I missed those classes, but I recognized that I wasn’t being myself, I was just being the people and choreographers I trained with. It is okay when you make choreography and you cite a dance ancestor. You know that it reminds you of certain things and you are aware. The problem is when you are not aware of these influences.

So a dialogue with ancestors should always be present, but sometimes you need to fight with their rules, even if you agree 100%, in order to find your own voice, your own attitude. And of course part of who you are will be influenced by your ancestors. You may end up developing an existing theory more deeply, or you will do the exact opposite.

Whatever the case, you need to have a dialogue and you need to look for mentors. That is very important. The mentors will not come to you, you as an artist need to get closer to what you like. Get close to the fire. Allow that mentor to be contagious and infect you with the knowledge they have to offer. Maybe it will just be for a period of time, and then you will move on. Mentors understand that when they live through these experiences. In my classes I sometimes say, “I love that you are coming to my class, but I do not want you to stay in my class forever. You need to move on.” It is part of this generosity and freedom you give to your students. It’s the same with your kids. You want them to be independent. You do not want them to depend on you. You want them to open their wings. You want them to find their own artistic voice. As a mentor, part of my job is to help them to think for themselves, because “Education is the Practice of Freedom” [Bell Hooks]. You recognize there are things in common, while gently encouraging differences.

Mentor and mentee choose each other.
Sometimes I chose a mentor and they did not choose me. In some ways it’s like a romantic relationship – one person initiates, one pursues the other, there’s a mutual agreement, – and the transmission of experience and knowledge happens. Again, I feel it is important that you have mentors, because you need to have artistic, spiritual and ethical dialogues.

Once, I thought that I found my true mentor: One of my ballet teachers in Argentina. I loved her. I even copied certain attitudes or certain gestures that she had. She was great. She was a mother, had two kids and also had a successful international career as a dancer. She was so elegant, so professional. I just loved her. That is, until I started to choreograph. I was sixteen years old, and I started to choreograph this one piece that was supposed to be performed for a festival. I invited her to one of my rehearsals, and she did not like what she saw. She said, “This is not a democratic system, if you want to

perform this piece for the festival, I am not allowing you to perform in my company anymore.” For me it was really hard to experience this because I admired her so much. But then I realized that this speech came more from jealousy of me beginning to spread my wings. So even though I admired her greatly, I never went back to take her classes or dance in her company. I quit dancing for her. I felt that she was not the right mentor for me anymore because she did not encourage me to find my own voice as a choreographer. I am very thankful for all the technical lessons and insights she gave me, but not the artistic or professional aspects. The jealousy she expressed, and her competitive impulses caused her to say what she said, and that drove us apart.

A good teacher is an excellent student. To teach is to be true to yourself, to acknowledge your darkest corners and your brightest moments. Teaching requires constant internal growth, a thirst to grow, to improve, to develop, and to evolve.
A good mentor is an eternal support, a point of reference.

Finding a mentor that’s right for you is about seeing them as a kind of mirror of your future self. Are you projecting yourself onto them or idealizing your future self? Perhaps. But being with the right mentor will help you embrace who you really are and bloom into your potential. Many of my mentees over these years tell me that they learn simultaneously how to be an artist as well as a woman, by seeing themselves reflected in my daily choices as both mother and artist.

The pandemic affirmed that I have to adapt, grow, and think out of the box! Teaching online makes me create new methodologies, and this is refreshing for me after teaching for 30 years.

Teaching online since March 2020, I have observed the students developing their focus, commitment, and enthusiasm, but not all the students feel engaged while studying online. Being so isolated has made some of them feel disconnected from their own bodies and lost. That’s why I have found myself needing to change my methodologies. Depending on the content, I either alter class times to be shorter, or just meet once a week for longer periods to avoid ZOOM fatigue. Altering the class rhythm, time administration, content and the sources of inspiration helps keep the students engaged. I send them a lot of links to articles, readings, and videos to see on their own time, research and study, so through critical thinking, I guide them into dialogue and discussions about the topics to empower students, create community, and camaraderie. I’ve found that during this pandemic, we are all sharing our vulnerability, our private spaces, and our art in a deeper way!

They wanted not only to receive encouragement and be able to improve technically and artistically during this pandemic, but also to belong to an online hub/virtual space, and spend quality time where artists meet, connect, exchange and collaborate.

Back in June 2020, after hearing the needs of my international dance
community, students and dancers, asking for personal coaching and mentoring,
I created two ONLINE programs:
The Online Choreographic Mentorship Workshops and the 1-ON-1 Choreographic Mentorship.

Why make myself available to be a mentor?

Because when you love what you do so much, you want to share it. Also, because I received so much love and care as a mentee, I feel a responsibility to give it back to the next generation of dancers, choreographers and teachers.

I want to make a better future for everyone and help make a better community. Dance, for me, is a union of a person with her interior. It is a communion with yourself, with others, with the environment, and with life.

“Mentor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam- webster.com/dictionary/mentor. Accessed 11 Jan. 2021.

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Dirigido por Anabella Lenzu

  • Fechas: Sábados en Septiembre de 10:00 am – 12:00 am via ZOOM (8 horas en total).
  • Costo: USD $65,00 

Inscripciones: fcosallato@gmail.com

http://www.AnabellaLenzu.com/news


Este workshop te dará las herramientas para crear tus propias danzas, explorando los elementos de composición, tanto para el escenario como para videodanza.
Se examinara el proceso creativo aprendiendo a asumir riesgos, pasando de pensar a sentir y tomar decisiones artísticas.


A través de tareas breves en clase y trabajo extenso fuera de clase, los participantes investigarán tanto la forma como el contenido de la coreografía, crearán y realizarán estudios  coreográficos. No solo miraremos lo que bailas, sino que también nos preguntamos “¿Por qué bailas?” La danza es el medio expresivo de nuestro corazón, mente y alma.


Objetivos del Workshop:

* Comprender los elementos coreográficos y sus diseños.

* Utilizar la exploración del movimiento y la improvisación para desarrollar un vocabulario del movimiento.

* Desarrollo de temáticas.

* Identificacion de formas coreográficas.

* Reconocimiento de estilos coreográficos.
* Desarrollo de  habilidades de analisis crítico y articuladamente una danza con mirada objetiva.

* Desarrollar las habilidades del pensamiento crítico.

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Online Workshop Coreografía para la Cámara en Chile
Dirijido por Anabella Lenzu (USA)
Organización: Francisco Sallato (Chile)

Sábados 10, 17 y 24 de Julio de 2021, via ZOOM
10am – 1pm, hora de Chile

Durante el workshop se ofrecerán herramientas para crear tus coreografías, explorando los elementos de la composición, tanto para el escenario como para realizar videos de danza. Examinaremos el proceso creativo aprendiendo a asumir riesgos y como tomar decisiones artísticas.Captura tus ideas en video y aprende cómo perfeccionar tu habilidad para fusionar los dos mundos creativos de la danza, teatro y el video.
Objetivos del Workshop: Comprender los elementos y el diseño coreográfico. 
Comprender la coreografía para la cámara y por la cámara.
Explorar cómo adaptar, extraer y crear el material coreográfico entre las composiciones de 3D a 2D.
Guiaremos a los participantes a través de ejercicios, discusiones y trabajos que analicen el papel de la interpretación y el uso del movimiento en la realización cinematográfica, asumiendo riesgos y limitaciones.

Temas:
– La pantalla como el escenario.
– Videoarte vs Videodance.
– Composición en 2D vs 3D
– Elementos de composición coreográfica
– Encuadre / Secuenciación / Duración
– Storyboarding
– Posiciones de la cámara y encuadres
– Historia, temas y motivos.

Destinado a: Bailarines, coreógrafos, actores, directores de teatro y videoastas.

TODAS LAS CLASES SON ONLINE Y A TRAVÉS DEL PROGRAMA ZOOM. DURANTE LOS WORKSHOPS SE GARANTIZA LA ATENCIÓN PERSONALIZADA Y SE INCLUIRÁ MATERIAL TEÓRICO.

PARA REGISTRARSE, ENVIAR EMAIL A: fcosallato@gmail.com

FECHA DE INSCRIPCIÓN: 10 de mayo al 5 de Julio, 2021.

CUPOS LIMITADOS.  

EL COSTO DEL WORKSHOP ES $75 USD POR PERSONA.

AL FINALIZAR EL WORKSHOP SE OTORGARÁ UN CERTIFICADO DE PARTICIPACIÓN.  

Biografia: Anabella Lenzu, bailarina, coreógrafa, escritora y maestra con más de 30 años de experiencia trabajando en Estados Unidos, Argentina e Italia. En Nueva York, Lenzu dirige su propia compañía, Anabella Lenzu / DanceDrama (ALDD), que desde 2006 ha presentado 390 presentaciones, creado 14 obras coreográficas de danza teatro y actuado en 100 lugares. 
Ha coreografiado en todo el mundo para ópera, programas de televisión, producciones teatrales y por muchas compañías de danza. Ha producido y dirigido varios cortometrajes de danza premiados  en más de 50 festivales tanto a nivel internacional, incluidos USA, Londres, Irlanda, Noruega, Suiza, Serbia, Portugal, Argentina, Brasil y México. Como educadora durante más de 30 años, ha estado enseñando en más de 50 instituciones, entre universidades, estudios profesionales de danza, empresas, festivales y simposios en Estados Unidos, Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Londres e Italia. Lenzu ha escrito para varias revistas de danza y arte. En 2013, publicó su primer libro Revelando Movimiento y Emoción ( bilingüe en Español e Inglés). El libro contiene escritos acerca de la creación coreografía y la pedagogía de la danza. Actualmente, Lenzu dicta clases en Nueva York en  NYU Gallatin, School of Visual Arts, Wagner College y Peridance Center.http://www.AnabellaLenzu.com

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Ministrado por Anabella Lenzu

Organização: Fernanda Ermelindo

Local: Zoom

Data: sextas-feiras 11, 18 e 25 de junho, 2021 horário: 19:00 às 21:30 (horário de Brasília)

Investimento -até 12/05: $415 após 12/05 : R$470

O objetivo do curso é adquirir um conhecimento do coreografar para a câmera e a coreografia da própria câmera ao filmar dança para todos os formatos de tela.
Exploraremos como adaptar, extrair e enxergar materiais coreográficos transmutando do 3D para o 2D.
Os participantes serão guiados por exercícios, debates e trabalhos que analisam o papel da performance e o uso do movimento em filmes, abraçando riscos e limitações.
Pensaremos questões como: O que é coreografia? Como analisamos a dança hoje?


* Além do seu crescimento pessoal, essa será uma oportunidade única de se conectar com outros artistas, trabalhando de maneira profunda e com uma forte visão.

PARA SE INSCREVER: POR FAVOR ENVIE SEU CV E UMA CARTA DE MOTIVAÇÃO EXPLICANDO SEU INTERESSE EM PARTICIPAR DO WORKSHOP PARA: fermelindo@gmail.com

**OBS.: UM CERTIFICADO DE CONCLUSÃO SERÁ ENTREGUE NO FIM DO WORKSHOP MEDIANTE SOLICITAÇÃO.

Tópicos abordados:

– O quadro como palco

– Video Arte X Screen dance 

– Composição em 2D e 3D

– Elementos de Dança

– Enquadramento/Sequência/Duração

– Começos e Finais

– Emotional beats

– Storyboarding

– Elementos Essenciais para História 

– Posições de Câmera e Shot List

Sobre Anabella Lenzu:  

Nascida na Argentina, Anabella Lenzu é bailarina, coreógrafa, escritora e professora com mais de 30 anos de experiência profissional na Argentina, Chile, Itália e EUA.  

Lenzu é diretora de sua companhia, Anabella Lenzu/DanceDrama (ALDD),  sediada em Nova York. Desde 2006 já criou 14 trabalhos coreográficos, 
performou 390 vezes e se apresentou em 100 locações distintas, trazendo aos palcos da cidade trabalhos de dança-teatro que provocam a mente e são histórica e socialmente engajados.

Como coreógrafa, Lenzu assinou trabalhos por todo o mundo para Ópera, TV, produções teatrais e inúmeras companhias de dança. Também produziu diversos videodanças premiados e exibiu seu trabalho em mais de 50 festivais pelos EUA e outros países, incluindo Inglaterra, Irlanda, Noruega, Suíça, Servia, Portugal, Argentina, Brasil e México. 

Fundou sua própria escola, L’Atelier Centro Creativo de Danza, em 1994, na Argentina. Com mais de 30 anos de experiência em educação, Anabella já lecionou em mais de 50 instituições, incluindo universidades, escolas profissionais de dança, companhias, festivais e simpósios nos EUA, Argentina, Brasil, Chile, e Itália. www.AnabellaLenzu.com

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Dance Composition/ Choreography Workshop

Theme: Ritual & Performance

Saturdays, May 8, 15 & 22, 2021

Dance is union and communion with ourselves, with others, and with the environment.
During this workshop, we will explore the connection between performance and ritual by using movement, spoken word, sounds, music, and props as tools.
We will explore how memory and spirituality shape identity and how rituals can document intimacy.
Performance is a conduit for examining cultural identity through form and content, as well as relationships between people and society.
We will observe the creative impulses and essential ways we celebrate life (and death), and in so doing, help us guess the meaning of life.

ALL CLASSES VIA ZOOM. 

I WILL PROVIDE INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION, FEEDBACK, AND GUIDANCE FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL, WHICH IS WHY ALL PARTICIPANTS NEED TO BE PRE-REGISTERED. NO SINGLE CLASSES ARE ALLOWED. EACH PARTICIPANT NEEDS TO REGISTER FOR THE ENTIRE LENGTH OF THE COURSE, SO I WILL BE ABLE TO DEDICATE MYSELF INTENSIVELY TO THE PROGRESS OF EACH ARTIST. IN ADDITION TO THE SCHEDULED CLASS TIME, ALL PARTECIPANTS CAN HAVE A ONE-ON-ONE 30 MIN PRIVATE CONSULTATION. THEORETICAL MATERIAL IS INCLUDED. 

CLASS SIZE IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS PER WORKSHOP.

TO APPLY: PLEASE SEND A COVER LETTER EXPLAINING WHY YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING AND YOUR RESUME TO **INFO@ANABELLALENZU.COM

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Interview by Ashmita Biswas

Ashmita: What is your creative process?


Anabella: This pandemic changed all of us. Whatever creative process I  knew about, I threw it out the window. So what is my creative process now in contrast to the past? For 30 years I have choreographed for the stage non-stop and right now, because of the pandemic, I started creating dance films in my home because it is a place where I feel safe, even though the space is limited. I live in a small apartment in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. I have 2 kids, a husband, a dog, and many belongings. It requires a lot of planning but at the same time I am very interested in exploring this environment that I live in, and I try to pour my personal and artistic life into this new creation. Since the pandemic, I have been studying filmmaking and video art at the School of Visual Arts, and I have also been doing a lot of research. 

The pandemic forced us off the stage, and at this moment I can’t envision myself choreographing for the stage again! The stage isn’t the right fit for the ideas and images I’m working with now. The images are more cinematic in nature. In general, I’m a choreographer who uses strong images. Now I’m figuring out the length and how I frame these ideas. It also led me to frame the body in a different way. On stage I perform and show my entire body, but now I can just choreograph with my face or my shoulder or with my elbows, or just my hands. So it gives me more possibilities to reframe my body. I am also able to incorporate my private life into it. It’s not that my previous works were very different. At the beginning it was political, then it was more ritualistic, then more spectacular and the last couple of years I found my work to be more along the lines of an autobiography. More recently, I’ve been diving deeply into my identity as an immigrant and as a mother, so my creative process has changed drastically. 

Ashmita: 
How different was your creative process before the pandemic when you were doing it for the stage? How would you approach it then?

Anabella: Well let’s see…for the stage, I was thinking about the whole spectacle, what we call the physical space or the body in space. I did many site-specific outdoor performances but my love is in the theater, in the black box. So from the perspective of a theatre, the idea develops in a different way, and perhaps there is more experimentation about movement. Now I’m thinking more with the outside eye. In the case of dance films, while researching I have a flash of a visceral image that could be a metaphor for something that could have textures, like smells and shapes. My husband is a professional photographer. He is usually the one who films and I direct him. We talk and discuss how much we want to show in the frame. Usually I do several shoot “studies” with my phone first, and then Todd film’s it with a nicer camera. 

I look for different ways to capture the movement, the emotions.

Choreography for me is an “Apparatus of Capture”, it is a way to capture a moment in time, sensations… an intimacy that the stage can not provide me. It is another form of communication. 

For example, I can give you a news by calling you on your phone or send you an email or write you a letter, or in person. It’s the same news but a different medium of sharing or communicating it.  I’m excited about dance films because it forces me to work on my creativity in a different way. 

This week we shot for 3 days with my daughter. It’s about women passing the legacy from one generation to another. I know that I will only have 1-2 hour windows to film this, so I discuss with my husband which day we can work on which scene. Then we improvise in front of the camera. This is different for me because I’m not an improviser, I’m a choreographer. But I feel that if I establish the texture and the environment for the film, I have the freedom to improvise. Then the choreography will happen in the editing process of the film. Of course I don’t have this opportunity when I’m doing a live show. In a film I can have many different versions depending on how it’s edited. I’m the creative head and my husband handles the technology, because I still refuse to learn about some of that stuff. I can’t do so many things at the same time. The whole process is fun! 

Ashmita:
 You mentioned about the pandemic before and how it changed this whole process, so could you talk a little more about how the pandemic brought about a change in your views as an artist and how you adapted to this change?

Anabella:
Last year, in June 2020,  I was supposed to premiere a full length show that I was working on for two years (commissioned by La Mama) for La Mama Moves Dance Festival and when the show was canceled,  I said to myself “I’m not going to throw all of this out of the window.” 

Two years of research and I thought “What am I going to do with the show…do I wait for this pandemic to be over?” So in the spur of the moment, I decided to make a dance film. I immediately had a talk with my director Daniel Petrow, my dramaturge Naoko Maeshiba & the photographer/ filmmaker Todd Carroll, and I said we’re going to keep rehearsing through zoom and we’re going to make a dance film. I decided to shoot this film in one shot, instead of editing it, in order to keep the feel of a live performance. We made a 28-minute non-stop film without editing. I had to record it several times as I had many props,  and the spacing was complicated. What the pandemic taught me is that we artists survive like cockroaches. No matter what happens, it is necessary for us to create and express ourselves and process life through art. If I don’t do that I would feel miserable and my body would feel crippled. I have to move and I have to choreograph in order to process reality. The pandemic taught us to be adaptive and because I have something that I want to share I find different mediums through which I can convey it. So I can write you an email or do a dance film, or I can perform live in the middle of the park. I don’t ask If, I ask How am I going to do it? I keep creating. Also the pandemic gave me a little more time because I wasn’t traveling like crazy all over New York for work and family. Last year, I had more time to do my research and read a lot of books. I had bought so many books over the last 10 years and stored them for exactly this time, it turns out. I feel that investing this extra time in reading gives my work a deeper meaning. 

Ashmita:
 Well it was so insightful to hear from a prominent artist like you and how you adapted to this whole situation in a positive manner and how you see a silver lining instead of being like “oh no everything is ruined”.

Anabella:
I feel that’s how we learn to survive and thrive and of course I cannot say that everything is rosy. There have been moments that I’ve been very depressed, but what kept me going is to wake up every morning and have something to learn and to create and that makes me start the day with enthusiasm. Even though I am at home and we don’t go out as much, there are not enough hours in a day for me to achieve everything that I want to do. Even when I have more time, it’s not enough, because it’s a constant hunger and thirst for knowledge, and that’s why I do Art.

Ashmita: Wow that’s really inspiring, thank you so much for sharing your knowledge.

*** Anabella’s Upcoming Events: https://www.anabellalenzu.com/news

***Anabella’s Upcoming Workshops: https://www.anabellalenzu.com/workshops


Ashmita Biswas, from Kolkata, started dancing Indian classical forms (Kathak and Bharatnatyam) at the age of five. While graduating in Business Administration (St. Xavier’s college), she completed a diploma course in Movement Arts from Rhythmosaic Dance Institute where she studied Ballet, Jazz, Contemporary, Tap and Kathak from Ronnie Ghosh and Dr. Mitul Sengupta. She then joined a Latin Dance company Vive La Salsa, Kolkata for three years where she trained, performed and taught Salsa, Bachata, Kizomba and Afro-Cuban Rumba under Aditya Upadhya.

In 2016, she joined The Danceworx, Mumbai where she trained in Ballet, Jazz and Contemporary. She was trained in ballet by ballet master Yehuda Maor from Israel.

In 2017, she moved to New York City to study Ballet, Contemporary and Salsa in the Peridance Center. She graduated from Peridance in 2020 majoring in Salsa. She is currently training, performing and teaching with a prestigious salsa company, Baila Society, New York (Directed by Ahtoy Wonpat Borja). Salsa Congress(Mexico), Boston Salsa Festival, New York International Salsa Congress, Connecticut Salsa Congress, etc are some of the festivals and events where she has performed. She has also studied and performed under renowned contemporary artists such as Anabella Lenzu, Apollonia Holzer and Martha Chapman. Being a Teaching Artist in Notes In Motion, she has had the privilege of teaching children(Pre-K to 12) in Public schools. Recently she taught Creative Movement and Salsa to children and adults in India through remote learning. 

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from JUN 14 – JUL 26, 2021

Monday  6:00-8:00 PM (EST)  6 sessions

To REGISTER

https://sva.edu/academics/continuing-education/art-activism/courses/my-body-my-country-composition-in-2d-and-3d-21-cu-vsc-2253-ol

In a time where feeling disconnected from our bodies is the new normal, this course helps students explore their own body and presence by conjuring body images and physical gestures. We will explore issues of identity, social relationships and agency, through study and the shared creative process. Students will become familiar with key ideas in performance, as well as important artists like Trisha Brown, Anna Halprin, Carolee Schneemann, the Gutai Group, Ana Mendieta, and Tony Orrico. Inspired by these figures, we will engage in a set of vigorous and liberating creative exercises using the Body Mapping technique, where texts, drawings and movement will be employed to share the stories of our bodies and experience. Participants will create 2D (drawing, photography, video, collage and mixed media), and later 3D compositions (site-specific, installations, dance, theater and performance art), to expand their artistic vocabulary. This course is ideal for visual artists looking to expand their work in performance, as well as anyone looking to get back in touch with their body and art. No background in performance required. 
NOTE: This course is fully online and offered through a combination of synchronous as well as asynchronous lectures and discussions. Students are invited to attend regularly scheduled online sessions during the listed course hours.

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Choreography for the Camera Workshop

by Anabella Lenzu

Saturdays, April 10, 17 & 24, 2021

11-2pm (EDT) NYC Time

https://www.anabellalenzu.com/workshops

  • This three-day workshop will be led by choreographer Anabella Lenzu and photographer Todd Carroll.The objective of the course is to gain an understanding of choreographing for the camera and the choreography of the camera when recording dance for all screens. Explore how to adapt, extract and see choreographic material transform from 3D to 2D.We will lead participants through exercises, discussions, and works that look at therole of performance and the use of movement in filmmaking, embracing risks and limitations.I invite participants to explore questions like: What is Choreography? How do we read dance now?  What is performancefor you now during the pandemic? For Filmmakers, directors, choreographers anddancers interested in dance film collaborations. 

ALL CLASSES VIA ZOOM. 
I WILL PROVIDE INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION, FEEDBACK, AND GUIDANCE FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL, WHICH IS WHY ALL PARTICIPANTS NEED TO BE PRE-REGISTERED. NO SINGLE CLASSES ARE ALLOWED. EACH PARTICIPANT NEEDS TO REGISTER FOR THE ENTIRE LENGTH OF THE COURSE, SO I WILL BE ABLE TO DEDICATE MYSELF INTENSIVELY TO THE PROGRESS OF EACH ARTIST. IN ADDITION TO THE SCHEDULED CLASS TIME, ALL PARTECIPANTS CAN HAVE A ONE-ON-ONE 30 MIN PRIVATE CONSULTATION. THEORETICAL MATERIAL IS INCLUDED. 
CLASS SIZE IS LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS PER WORKSHOP.

TO APPLY: PLEASE SEND A COVER LETTER EXPLAINING WHY YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING AND YOUR RESUME TO **INFO@ANABELLALENZU.COM. PLEASE DESIGNATE WHAT WORKSHOP YOU ARE INTERESTED IN.

THE COST FOR ONE WORKSHOP IS $200 PER PERSON.
**NOTE: AT THE END OF EACH WORKSHOP YOU WILL RECEIVE A CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION UPON REQUEST.

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